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From Edinburgh to London: 11-Day Itinerary through Scotland and England

From Edinburgh to London: 11-Day Itinerary through Scotland and England | CosmosMariners.com
The ruins of St. Andrews Castle, St. Andrews, Scotland

One of the first major trips that my husband and I took together after we were married was to the UK. I was (and still am!) an Anglophile through and through, having been to the country multiple times before this trip, including a study abroad stint in London during college.

My husband, on the other hand, had only been out of the country once--on our honeymoon cruise to the Caribbean--and had no idea of what awaited him on this trip.

What to See in Farnham, Surrey: A Guest Post by The Way I Wanderlust

What to See in Farnham, Surrey | CosmosMariners.com

I love finding new travel blogs, so I was delighted to come across The Way I Wanderlust, a travel blog written by the lovely Kayleigh. While she's lived all over the world, she was kind enough to highlight a few of her favorite things to do in Farnham, Surrey, England--which I immediately knew would be a perfect fit for my Anglophile self.

So, read on, and, hopefully, get inspired to visit this gorgeous part of England yourself.
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Hello, lovely Cosmos Mariners readers! My name is Kayleigh, and I blog over at The Way I Wanderlust where I write about my travels and trying to live a creative life.

Let me tell you a little about myself. I grew up in the British Army, so you can say I have loved to travel since I was very little. My family moved to Canada when I was about ten, moving several times in the next ten years. In my twenties, I have made it my mission to see and experience as many places as I could. I have backpacked through Europe for about fifteen months and lived in Australia for a year as well as taking smaller trips here and there.

What to See in Farnham, Surrey | CosmosMariners.comLately, over on my blog, I have been writing a lot about my trip to England and Wales that I took last fall. Today, I would love to share with you a few must see things in and around the Farnham, Surrey area.

Farnham, Surrey

I spent a few years growing up in this quaint little town. It has many things to offer: boutique clothing stores, farmers markets, coffee shops, and the huge park which includes Farnham castle. This beautiful town is well worth the visit. Spend the day wandering around the shops, check out the cathedral, walk along the river and the park. Spend a few hours relaxing in the grass, having a picnic, reading or just enjoying the peace and quiet.

What to See in Farnham, Surrey | CosmosMariners.com


The Sculpture Park

The Sculpture Park is located about 30 mins outside of Farnham, Surrey. It's the largest year round sculpture exhibition in the world with over 600 sculptures from many different artists. Tucked away in acres of maintained ponds and flowers gardens, it's a magical experience. Most of the sculptures are also available for purchase--if only I had more room in my suitcase!

Allow yourself to get lost and wander through the trails. Each sculpture is set up in a unique area which sets the scene for amazing pictures. I would recommend breaking up your day by wandering over to the pub across the street which offers all kinds of refreshments.

What to See in Farnham, Surrey | CosmosMariners.com


Jane Austen's House Museum

I have been a long time Jane Austen fan as I am sure many other people are. Whenever I have taken trips to England, I always make it a habit of stopping by one of the places that feature something regarding Jane Austen. Located in Chawton, Hampshire, it's about 16 mins away from Farnham. This is a really small town and there really isn't much else to it other then the museum, although there is a lovely cafe right across the street.

This beautiful 18th century house is where she spent the last 8 years of her life. The house itself features artifacts that belonged to Jane Austen. Walk through the rooms and experience how she lived back then. Outside, wander through the cottage garden where you are free to sit and enjoy a picnic.

What to See in Farnham, Surrey | CosmosMariners.com


Waverley Abbey

Located about 2 miles outside of Farnham, this abbey is well worth the trip. One of the first abbeys to be built in England, it was, unfortunately, mostly destroyed during the dissolution of the monasteries. Hidden away in the countryside with nothing around it for miles, it is a very peaceful place. Walk around and enjoy the serenity that is offered by this mystical place. The abbey is well maintained and even has drawings of what it use to look like when it was first built.

What to See in Farnham, Surrey | CosmosMariners.com

Thank you for letting me take over this lovely blog for a day. I hope you have enjoyed exploring a secret spots around the Farnham area!

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Check out more of Kayleigh's travels or connect with her! 

Which of these places would you be most excited to visit? What parts of England have you seen?

P.S. If you're interested in sharing your literary or history-based travels with my readers, I'd love to feature you, too! Email me at cosmosmariners@gmail.com for more information and to set up a date. 

Studying Abroad at Oxford University: a Guest Post by Sara Laughed

Studying Abroad at Oxford University: a Guest Post by Sara Laughed | CosmosMariners.com

Hi, fellow mariners! Today, I'm happy to introduce you to a new blogger who's doing something that I always wanted to do--study abroad at Oxford University. Sara from Sara Laughed is enjoying her year in England and blogging about all of it before she returns to her home university in Massachusetts at the end of this school year. I asked her to share what it's like to live and study at the English speaking world's oldest institute of higher learning. Enjoy!

Studying Abroad at Oxford University: a Guest Post by Sara Laughed | CosmosMariners.comHi friends! My name is Sara and I blog over at Sara Laughed about college life, love, and travel. I'm a current college student studying abroad at Oxford University. Since Natalie studied abroad in London while she was in college, she reached out and asked me to share with you some details of my time at Oxford. I hope this gives you the chance to live vicariously through my experience and get a little glimpse of what makes Oxford so magical!

It was a snowy morning in Massachusetts when I found out I'd been accepted to Oxford for my year abroad. I was thrilled - I called my parents and danced around my room in my pajamas. On the one hand, I had wanted nothing more than to get into this program - to live abroad and to experience a new university and a new culture. On the other, I was completely terrified. I had no idea what Oxford would hold in store for me, and whether I could handle the pressure of a new university, in a new country, on another continent.

 It turns out I had nothing to worry about. I have loved almost everything about my time at Oxford, which has been about six months now. Being a Junior Year Abroad student means that I straddle the awkward line between resident and tourist - I still experience everything with fresh eyes, but I've lived here long enough to know the streets and shops and to have a regular routine.

Today, I'd like to share with you how Oxford looks through my, still new, eyes - here are 5 things I love about Oxford.

 5 // The colleges

Studying Abroad at Oxford University: a Guest Post by Sara Laughed | CosmosMariners.comThe Bridge of Sighs, part of Hertford College

Oxford is visually breathtaking. The university is the oldest in the English-speaking world, and because its colleges date in their origins between 1249 and 2008 (yes, really!), they features a huge variety of architectural styles. As a student, my university ID lets me into most of the colleges without trouble, meaning that I can attend Evensong services in Christ Church or go to my tutorial at Pembroke College, even though my own college is quite a walk away. I love that the college system gives students so much variety in what they can experience and explore.

4 // The libraries
Studying Abroad at Oxford University: a Guest Post by Sara Laughed | CosmosMariners.com
The Harris Manchester library.

The Oxford library system is absolutely incredible. The Bodleian Libraries include a total of 40 different libraries all around the city, with over 11 million books and printed items. Many of the libraries are also incredibly beautiful, internally or externally. Knowing that I have so much knowledge at my fingertips is amazing, and for a nerd like me, it's heaven!

  3 // The covered market
The Covered Market is a historic market near the center of Oxford with lots of little independent shops and cafés. The shops range from flower stores to a hat shop, and include a butcher and plenty of places to sit down for tea (or coffee, if that's your beverage of choice) or have lunch. I have a favorite café with both indoor and outdoor seating that serves warm drinks and delicious cakes!

  2 // The uniquely Oxford traditions
Studying Abroad at Oxford University: a Guest Post by Sara Laughed | CosmosMariners.comTorpids on the Thames.

Oxford has plenty of traditions that I would be unlikely to experience anywhere else. Punting on the Thames is a popular option in spring, as is playing croquet on your college's lawn (I'm excited to try both of these next term!). Last weekend I went to see Torpids, a special boat race in which the object is to "bump" the boat in front of you to move ahead. The race developed because the part of the Thames on which the race is held is too narrow for traditional boat racing. It was a very fun and strange experience that represented, to me, the many ways in which Oxford is unique.

 1 // The opportunities
Studying Abroad at Oxford University: a Guest Post by Sara Laughed | CosmosMariners.comThe first ball I attended.

However, if I had to choose the single thing I loved most about Oxford, it would be the incredible range of opportunities available to students. As a student, I've attended a wine tasting class, balls, college parties, formal dinners, lectures at the Oxford Union, and more. The city and university are so rich in what they have to offer that I know I'll never be able to try it all, no matter how long I stay here. All in all, I feel incredibly lucky to be spending a year in this beautiful small city. One of my parents was a fellow at Oxford, and as a result, this happens to be the city where I was born, though we moved away soon after. Maybe this year is the fates bringing me back; who knows what's in store next!
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If you liked reading about Sara's Oxford experiences, follow along with her for even more on college, her life, and her travels.

Have you ever been to Oxford? If not, what's one thing you'd like to experience?

How Studying Abroad Changed My Life

How Studying Abroad Changed My Life | CosmosMariners.com


In early June 2005, I clutched my passport in my sweaty hand and waved goodbye to my parents and my sister in the Atlanta airport. I wanted to cry because I was terrified, but I was even more worried about putting on a brave face for my family. I'd thought about this moment for months, and I didn't want to spoil it by sobbing into the shirt of a TSA agent. Plus, I'd juggled four part-time jobs over the preceding year to afford the tuition and room and board, and I wanted to at least pretend I was getting my money's worth.

I was almost 20 and embarking on what would be become one of the most pivotal moments in my life: studying abroad in London for a summer through the IES London program.

At the time, leaving my parents, my sister, and my boyfriend (who'd eventually become my husband many years later) to explore one of the world's greatest cities seemed like a great way to spend a summer.

It seemed like a great way to get some of those once-in-a-lifetime college experiences--you know, those that you keep rehashing for years to come.

It seemed like a great way to cram a few more credit hours into my already packed college schedule. (And yes, this was a particular goal of mine, as I was--at the time--heading to law school in a few years and wanted to create the most stellar academic C.V. possible).

Yet, if I'd known at the moment of sheer terror and excitement what I know now about my study abroad experience, I would have plowed over everyone waiting in that TSA line in the hopes of starting it sooner. (To my parents--don't worry, I still would have missed you the same amount!)

It was only 6 weeks, but it changed everything.

With my roommate Nicole in front of the Abbey Road Studios
I learned that people are the same, even halfway across the world. Before living in London, I'd been on many, many trips with my parents, several of which were outside the country. But, since I'd never been completely on my own before, I'd never fully realized how much people are alike even when culture and distance divides us.

I had bus drivers kindly help me find my stop when I was confused (which was pretty much every time I took the bus for the first two weeks).

I had Tube workers patiently (oh, so patiently) help me figure out how much was on my Oyster card. Again. (This was back in the dark ages when no one had a smartphone to check these things.)

At the bookstore, at the grocery store, at the open air markets, I would bumble my way through things. I was just one person in this big city, and it would've been so easy to push me to the side or be annoyed with me. But, 99% of the time, I was met with friendliness and patience, something for which I will always be grateful.

Brighton Pier on a day trip. Don't laugh at the pink sunglasses--they were really popular in London that year!


I learned that it was okay be alone sometimes. In a city of 11 million people, it's easy to get lost in the faceless crowds of residents, commuters, and visitors in London on any given day. You could be anyone--or no one. While I made some great friends through the program, I enjoyed taking my school books to a nearby park to read alone, or sit on the Tube with a hundred other nameless people all going our own ways. Up until that point in my life, I'd always felt that I needed someone with me--my parents, my sister, my boyfriend, my friends. But I didn't. I managed just fine on my own.

Stonehenge (not the time I got to go into the circle!). And again, more bad sunglasses. Apparently, this was the summer of poor eyewear choices.

I learned what it was like to fall completely in love with another culture. That summer was the time when I realized what it meant to be an Anglophile.

I studied Shakespeare's plays before taking my position with all of the other groundlings to see a performance of Macbeth in the Globe.

I poured over new foods with strange names in the grocery store: Hob Nobs ("nobbly oaty bits"), digestives (which are nowhere near as disgusting as they sound), mustard mayonnaise (a strange concoction of condiments that tastes neither like mayo or mustard or the combo of the two), and spotted dick (which is TOTALLY not what you're thinking of, you perv. It's a type of canned pudding. Duh.).

I learned the variances in British accents, and, by the end of the session, could more or less tell you from where a person hailed in the British Isles.

I was obsessed with the minutiae of Britain and all of the big stuff and everything in between. And, nearly ten years later, I'm still going strong.


I learned that, even in the face of great loss, what people want most is each other. I happened to be on a bus on the way to a field trip in Trafalgar Square when the news began to break about the 7/7/2005 terrorist bombings. A Tube car and a double decker bus had been hit and over 50 people died that day: cell phone communication was impossible for hours, planes were grounded, and there was so much confusion everywhere. London as a whole reeled from the news in the hours after the attacks, but in the days afterwards, I saw how strong London was.

That week was supposed to be a joyous one--London had just found out that it had won the 2012 Olympics bid, and there was a huge celebration planned in Trafalgar Square to official announce the good news. Instead, that celebration was converted into a public rally to remember those who'd died and to call for peace. I stood shoulder to shoulder with people from all over the globe, people who, for that one day, were united in our desire to be one with London.

The night that my friends and I stood in line to get the newest Harry Potter book fresh off the press. I had to put down a 5 pound retainer and then wait in line at midnight to get the book, that bag, and that sweet raincoat!

I learned that it's more important to follow your heart than your pocketbook. As I mentioned earlier, I was still planning on going to law school at this point in my academic career.

And go to law school I did...for a year. I was so miserable by my second semester that I dropped out, the first time in my life that I'd actually failed something. When I tell you that I loved school, I'm telling the truth. I. LOVED. IT. I'd never not been good at school before, and I was floundering in law school.

I didn't like school anymore. I stopped going to classes. I stopped doing my homework. I stopped enjoying the thing that, heretofore, had been the reason I got up in the morning.

So, I took some time off after law school, got a job at a little stationery shop, and thought. And thought. And thought.

All that I could remember for those months was how happy I'd been back in undergrad, taking classes, writing and researching for my English major. I keep coming back to one class in particular: Modern British Novels. It was taught by Julie Charalambides, who, aside from having one of the coolest names ever, was one of the greatest teachers I'd ever had. We read seven novels that summer--I can still tell you the titles of all seven--and I poured over every single one. 

I thought about those novels while I worked long hours in that stationery shop. I thought about what I wanted to do with my life. And then, one day, it dawned on me: I'd go to grad school to study more of those modern British novels. 

Two years later, I walked across the stage at the University of South Carolina to get my M.A. in (you guessed it!) British literature. And not just any British literature--modern British literature. It took five years after I came home from London to learn that final lesson.

But that's what a study abroad session does: it sneaks up on you in the best way possible, and before you know it, you see life completely differently.

In the Cotswolds


Did you study abroad? If so, where did you go?

Note: if you're interested in a London summer study abroad program, I cannot recommend IES enough. I'm not getting paid in any way to say that--I just loved my time there that much.

5 Historic Southern Scottish Places You Don't Want to Miss

5 Historic Southern Scottish Places You Don't Want to Miss | CosmosMariners.com

If you like exploring castles, wandering through ruins in the mist, or trying to solve a historical mystery or two, you need to get to Scotland. Immediately, if at all possible!

While many associate the country with Loch Ness, Glasgow, and Edinburgh, there's so much to see in the southern portion of Scotland. Don't overlook these gems, all of which are located within an hour and a half or so of the England/Scotland border.

3 Hidden Experiences in and around London

3 Hidden Experiences in and around London | CosmosMariners.com


London is, in my opinion, one of the greatest cities in the world. As Samuel Johnson said, "When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life." One of the wonderful things about London is that there's always something new to see or do, another restaurant to try, another alleyway to explore.

There's this great novel by Geoff Nicholson, Bleeding London, in which one of the characters tries (and fails) to walk every street in the A to Zed. No matter how long you've lived there or how many times you've visited, London still has mysteries to discover. 

During my time in London (a decade-long love affair that includes four glorious trips and a study abroad stint), I've tried to crack some of the city's secrets. If you've seen the usual sites--Big Ben, Westminster Abbey, Trafalgar Square, and the like--here are three experiences that will help you deepen your understanding of London and the surrounding area

Hidden Experiences in and Around London | CosmosMariners.com

1) The Ceremony of the Keys at the Tower of London. 

Pretty much everyone in the world recognizes the Tower of London; it has, after all, been around since William the Conqueror's early reign almost a millennium ago. Most people don't know about the ceremony that takes place each night as a symbolic way to secure the property. Tickets are free, but since a very small number of people are allowed each night, you'll need to book way in advance. 

Hidden Experiences in and Around London | CosmosMariners.com
Yes, I was THAT close to Stonehenge!

2) Getting up close and personal at Stonehenge. 
The first time I visited, I was disappointed. The regular visitor path keeps you from getting too close to the stones, and there wasn't much context for the site other than what you learned on the audio guide. 

However, on a more recent trip, I went on a sunset tour of the property with one of the archeologists studying Stonehenge, and whoa, what a difference the guide makes. We drove around the entire property (which is much larger than you'd think), looked at the burial grounds located across the roadway from the main site, and then got to see the stones up close (really close: I could have touched them if I hadn't been worried about toppling something over!) 

Multiple outlets offer similar expeditions, and they don't come cheap--but if you're interested in learning more about this UK landmark, it's money well spent.

Hidden Experiences in and Around London | CosmosMariners.com
Hello, all of you sad souls that stood out in the rain for three hours. I, too, know what it's like to be on the other side of the gate.

3) Changing of the Guard from behind the gates of Buckingham Palace. 

If you've ever been to London, chances are you've squeezed into the giant crowd that forms each morning to watch the Queen's guard. I had the chance to see the ceremony from a unique perspective: from inside the gates! 

While I had to stand off to one side up against the building, I had an unparalleled vantage viewpoint for the ceremony--when the Irish Guard (with their mascot, the Irish greyhound) came by, I could almost reach out and pet the dog. (N.B.: not a great idea.) This is, unfortunately, one of those events where you have to know somebody that knows somebody (as was the case when I visited--one of my travel companions knew of someone who knew Prince Philip's secretary), but I supposed you could just write the royal secretaries and beg. The worst they can do is say no!

Would you be interested in doing any of these? What lesser known attractions or experiences have you done in London?

8 Reasons Why You Should Visit Scotland

8 Reasons Why You Should Visit Scotland | CosmosMariners.com

Of all of the places that I've visited, few have capture my imagination as Scotland did. From the kilts and tartans to the rolling accents, Scotland is mysterious, alluring, and breathtaking. 

With sheep innards pudding, lifestock with Beatles' haircuts, and a swimming dinosaur beckoning to you, Scotland should be on everyone's travel radar.

The Ultimate Guide of Things to See and Do in London




As I've mentioned just a few times a million times here on the blog, I'm in love with London. My first trip was in 2003 where I fell head over heels for the city, and I headed back for a study abroad session while in college. My love runs so deep that I devoted two years of my life to studying the post-World War II novels set in London as a part of my master's thesis. 

It stands to reason, then, that I'm the first to sing the city's praises. And that's pretty easy to do because London has SO much to see and do. Here's my ultimate list for the things to do in and around London.

5 Must-See Castles in the UK {Guest Post by Jamie from Gunters Abroad}

Today's guest poster, Jamie from Gunters Abroad, is a woman after my own heart! I live vicariously through her blog as she shares her new life overseas. Her guest post has me ready to jump on a plane and go see all of these beautiful sites. Read on, and don't forget to show some love to Jamie on her social media channels (found at the bottom of the post)!
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Hello Cosmos Mariners readers! I am super happy to be filling in for Natalie while she is away on her adventures! 

My name is Jamie and I blog at Gunters Abroad. I recently moved to the UK with my husband and pets and we are absolutely loving our lives as expats. 

Over in my little corner of the world, “castleing” has become a normal term for my husband and I. We love traveling throughout the UK and finding castles or castle ruins to explore. So today I am sharing with you our top 5 castles to explore while in the UK.